Twitter: @AAvanth
LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/avanth/

There is good reason to be optimistic about the future if you ask Alexander Avanth, a rising talent within exponential technology research. Over the years Alexander has developed a holistic understanding of emerging technological trends, encompassing the technical advancements and our social, political, and humanitarian reactions to these. His findings suggest that with the right educational focus on leveraging new tools and lifelong learning, technological threats to our traditional livelihoods can be transformed into profound life-enhancing opportunities for the masses.

Driven by a natural curiosity and eagerness to unravel complex themes, Alexander’s studies have always centered around a playful and open-minded approach. He has a solid theoretical grounding as a MSc. in Business Development & Innovation with a minor in Neuroscience from CBS. On a more spiritual level, Alexander is also an ordained Buddhist monk from the Kunnathi Temple in Thailand. Through his work Alexander has established himself as an influential member within the Danish entrepreneurial community. He is both a teacher and a student, and regularly participates in case competitions and exponential technology workshops.

In his talks Alexander argues that the human brain is not built to understand the rate of development that is actual in technology - it is simply too fast, vast and complex to grasp. At the same time, technology has become a paradox in itself, both separating us and bringing us together. How do we navigate and make decisions in a future that is increasingly uncertain? And how do we steer technology adoption towards collectiveness and not dividedness?

According to Alexander, the answer lies in educating for a dynamic yet critical thinking. The impact of technology has namely caused the half-life of a skill (and a job) to shrink rapidly, from 30 years to 5 years, which points to the growing need for continuous education and re-education. We must learn to readjust for specific learning rather than learning for the sake of learning. Knowing what to learn, and perhaps more importantly; what to un-learn will be key.

Alexander will guide you through exponential technology, promote an open mind, ‘just-in-time learning’ and the power of nano-degrees as means to manage tomorrow’s uncertainty. His talks also explore the dilemmas and ethics of the future, and its impact on the human experience.